Action Steps to Improve Your City

As we begin 2017, HAKS would like to share Curbed New York’s suggestions on initiatives we can launch to improve our cities.  We have culled a small number from the list; you can access them all at 101 Small Ways You Can Improve Your City. Continue Reading…

Recommissioning of Gilboa Dam

Recommissioning of Gilboa

Recommissioning of Gilboa

On October 31, 2014, HAKS Senior Vice President Al Lopez, P.E., and Vice President Todd Yanoff, P.E., of our Water/Wastewater Group, joined New York City Department of Environmental Protection (NYCDEP) Commissioner Emily Lloyd and other dignitaries at the recommissioning of the Gilboa Dam in Schoharie County, New York.  A HAKS-led joint venture has been providing Construction Management services for the rehabilitation of the dam—the firm’s largest construction management project to date and believed to be the largest public works project in the Catskills. D&B Engineers and Architects, PC/URS was our joint venture partner; Gannett Fleming/Hazen and Sawyer joint venture was designer; and Barnard Construction/DA Collins joint venture was the contractor. The NYCDEP initiated this $400 million project to extend the life of the dam another 100 years and bring it into compliance with New York State Department of Environmental Conservation safety standards. Says Commissioner Lloyd, “This was a safety project foremost.” Phase 3 of this massive undertaking, the $138 million reconstruction of the Gilboa Dam, has been completed two years ahead of schedule in spite of a nine-month delay caused by Tropical Storm Irene. Continue Reading…

Activation of Manhattan Leg of Third City Water Tunnel

Third Water 1New York City requires 1.3 billion gallons of water daily for its more than 9 million residents. The precarious condition of the city’s aging water tunnels had been its gravest infrastructure threat until October 16th when Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg announced the activation of the final 8.5-mile Manhattan stage of the Third City Water Tunnel. Until this major milestone, Tunnel No. 1 was so critical that the city couldn’t turn it off to inspect it. “If we were to lose one of the tunnels without backup, that part of the city would be uninhabitable,” said Bloomberg. Continue Reading…