Drones Set to Take Off

Drone-4Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), popularly known as drones, were originally designed to carry out military missions that were deemed too dangerous for humans or for which manned aircraft were impractical. What we would recognize today as drones were jointly developed by Israel and the US during the 1980s and deployed against Iraq during the 1991 Gulf War, and have since become a staple of modern warfare and antiterrorism activities. However, due to ongoing improvements in technology and miniaturization and decreasing costs, the use of drones has since expanded far beyond the military sphere to many other applications, including science, recreation, aerial photography, product delivery, agriculture, law enforcement, surveillance, and even protecting elephants from poachers. Continue Reading…

Hidden Perils in Summer Sunshine

Contributed by Brenda Gomez, Environmental Staff Engineer/Scientist

NYC (1)

August is the homestretch of summer, when people take to the beach, barbecue, and generally try to enjoy as much outdoor time as possible before the Labor Day holiday portends the onset of school, shorter days, and colder weather. Unfortunately, summer is also when air quality is at its worst. Heat waves like the ones we have been enjoying lately create photochemical oxidants as the sun’s ultraviolet radiation cooks the air to produce a layer of ozone smog. Continue Reading…

Looking Beyond Safety Week

SafetyWeek logoThis year, more than 40 national and global construction firms comprising The Construction Industry Safety group and the Incident and Injury Free CEO Forum joined forces to create and celebrate Safety Week from May 2-6.  As a follow up, our blog this month looks at safety regulations and practices in the construction industry.  The numbers are jarring: According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, 4,679 workers were killed on the job in 2014. Out of the 4,251 worker fatalities in private industry that year, 874 (or 20.5%) were in construction.  According to OSHA, the leading cause of worker deaths on construction sites was falls, followed by electrocution, struck by objects and “caught-in/betweens.” During safety week, OSHA held a National Safety Stand-Down to raise awareness of fall prevention. Continue Reading…